DM 824

DM 824 – Materials Selection in Design

The concept of materials selection as an integral part of the design process is presented. Issues addressed include: choice of material; method of manufacture; failure modes; tailoring of microstructure to obtain optimal properties and in-service performance. Content will be reinforced through case studies that consider a variety of material classes.

This course presents the concept of materials selection as an integral part of the mechanical engineering design process. Materials selection addresses a number of issues: the choice of material; the method of part manufacture; potential modes/mechanisms of failure; as well as the tailoring of material microstructure to obtain optimal properties and in-service performance. Background topics will include mechanical engineering design, solid mechanics, engineering component design, and materials science and engineering. Material selection methodologies will range from conventional, holistic approaches to the deterministic method of Ashby. Course content will be reinforced through case studies that consider a variety of material classes.

Course Leader: Keith Pilkey, Queen’s Engineering

Course Overview

The overall objective of this course is to learn how to integrate materials selection into the design process at an early stage. Specific objectives are: (i) to review and upgrade students’ knowledge of mechanical system and component design, engineering materials, failure modes and mechanisms, and materials selection in design for service; (ii) to develop students’ skills in materials selection methodologies and the use of various material property resources. This course is directed towards practicing engineers in all disciplines who are involved with aspects of design, manufacturing, maintenance and regulation.

Activities and Schedule

In general, each day will consist of 4-5 hours of lectures and class discussion, and 1-2 hours of individual or group exercises.

Module 1

Day 1
  • Introduction to materials selection in design
  • Mechanical engineering design
  • Solid mechanics
  • Engineering component design
Day 2
  • Structure, properties, processing and performance of materials
  • Materials classes: metals, polymers, ceramics and composites
Day 3
  • Modes and mechanisms of material failure
  • Overview of materials selection in design
  • Discussion of individual projects

Between Modules

  • Preparation of proposal for individual project

Module 2

Day 1
  • Materials selection in design
    • Conventional, holistic approaches
    • Ashby method
  • Feedback and further discussion of project proposals
Day 2
  • Case studies I:
    • Lightweighting of automobiles
    • Microelectronic packaging
    • Protective coatings
Day 3
  • Case studies II:
    • Sporting goods
    • High-temperature applications
  • Discussion of final project deliverables

After Module 2

  • Completion of individual project

Course Evaluation

  • 25% – In-class participation
  • 25% – Project proposal
  • 50% – Final project report

Biographies of Course Leaders

Keith Pilkey, Ph.D., P.Eng.
keith.pilkey@queensu.ca

Keith Pilkey is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Queen’s University. His research interests are in the areas of material deformation and failure mechanisms related to a wide variety of engineering materials and applications, ranging from steel and aluminum alloy sheet and the forming of automotive structures to cancellous bone and the decrease in fracture strength caused by bone-degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis.  Dr. Pilkey teaches materials science, solid mechanics, and deformation processing at the undergraduate level, and metal forming and materials selection at the graduate level.

Brad Diak, Ph.D., P.Eng.
brad.diak@queensu.ca

Dr. Brad Diak is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Queen’s University. His research involves: dynamic measurements of the thermodynamics of plastic flow in metals, alloys, and polymers over large temperature ranges and volumes; studies of solute-defect interactions in metallic solid solutions; control of texture and microstructure development and hence materials properties by processing; developing of new materials characterization methods; and pedagogy in the Materials Science and Engineering discipline. Dr. Diak is a member of the TMS, ASM and MRS.