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DM 824

DM 824 - Materials Selection in Design

This course presents the concept of materials selection as an integral part of the mechanical engineering design process. Materials selection addresses a number of issues: the choice of material; the method of part manufacture; potential modes/mechanisms of failure; as well as the tailoring of material microstructure to obtain optimal properties and in-service performance. Background topics will include mechanical engineering design, solid mechanics, engineering component design, and materials science and engineering. Material selection methodologies will range from conventional, holistic approaches to the deterministic method of Ashby. Course content will be reinforced through case studies that consider a variety of material classes.

Course Leader: Keith Pilkey, Queen’s Engineering

Course Overview

The theme of this course is how to integrate materials selection into the design process at an early stage. The objectives are: 1) to upgrade students’ knowledge of mechanical design, engineering materials, failure mechanisms and materials selection in design for service; 2) to develop their skills in materials selection methodologies and the use of sources of information on materials properties. This course is directed towards practicing engineers of all disciplines who are involved with design, manufacturing, maintenance and regulation.

Course Objectives

The theme of this course is how to integrate materials selection into the design process at an early stage. Course objectives are: 1) to upgrade students’ knowledge of mechanical design, engineering materials, failure mechanisms and materials selection in design for service and 2) to develop their skills in materials selection methodologies and the use of sources of information on materials properties.

Activities and Schedule

In general, each day will consist of 4-5 hours of lectures and class discussion, and 1-2 hours of group problem exercises. On Day 4 of Module 1, the take-home mid-course exam will be issued and each student will be asked to select a project topic based on his/her experience. On Day 4 of Module 2, the take-home final exam will be issued, and the requirements for each student’s project will be defined.

Module 1

Day 1
  • Review of mechanical design principles
  • Introduction to materials selection in design for service
  • Group exercise on materials selection problems
Day 2
  • Failure by fracture
  • Ductile fracture
  • Brittle fracture
  • Fracture mechanics and fracture-safe design
  • Group exercise on fracture problems
Day 3
  • Time-dependent service failures
  • Fatigue
  • Creep
  • High-rate failures
  • Group exercise on time-dependent service failures
Day 4
  • Environment-assisted service failures
  • Corrosion
  • Stress corrosion cracking
  • Corrosion fatigue
  • Group exercise on environment-assisted service failures
  • Discussion on individual projects

Between Modules

  • Completion of mid-course take-home exam
  • Preparation of proposal for individual project

Module 2

Day 1
  • Review of materials properties identified in Module 1.
  • Four classes of engineering materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, hybrid)
  • Structure-property relationships in engineering materials
  • Group exercise on materials structure-property relationships
Day 2
  • Review of materials properties identified in Module 1.
  • Four classes of engineering materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, hybrid)
  • Structure-property relationships in engineering materials
  • Group exercise on materials structure-property relationships
Day 3
  • Materials selection methodologies
  • Optimizing combinations of materials properties
  • Sources of information (Materials data bases, handbooks, standards, materials manufacturers)
  • Group exercise on data searching
Day 4
  • Case study examples of materials selection in design for service
  • Discussion of individual projects

After Module Completion

  • Completion of final examination
  • Completion of individual project

Course Evaluation

  • 20% - Take-home mid-term examination
  • 40% - Individual project based on student’s experience
  • 40% - Take-home final examination

Biography of Course Leader

Keith Pilkey, P.Eng. keith.pilkey@queensu.ca

Keith Pilkey is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Queen’s University. His research interests are in the areas of material failure mechanisms, metallographic image analysis and metal forming. He teaches materials science and deformation processing at the undergraduate level, and metal forming and materials selection at the graduate level.

Contact Us

University of Western Ontario
Queen's University